Tag Archives: concept book

Perfect Pairing – Promotes Social Action

I met both of these authors at a fabulous recent Highlights Foundation Master Class for Non-Fiction writers. When I read these books, I knew I had to pair them! And for those heading back to school now, note that the first book features a classroom setting.

Be a King: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream and You

Author: Carole Boston Weatherford

Illustrator: James E. Ransome

Publisher/Date: Bloomsbury Children’s Books/2018

Ages: 4-8

Themes: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., social justice, take action, multicultural

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

You can be a King. Stamp out hatred. Put your foot down and walk tall.

You can be a King. Beat the drum for justice. March to your own conscience.

Featuring a dual narrative of the key moments of Dr. King’s life alongside a modern class as the students learn about him, Carole Weatherford’s poetic text encapsulates the moments that readers today can reenact in their own lives. See a class of young students as they begin a school project inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and learn to follow his example, as he dealt with adversity and never lost hope that a future of equality and justice would soon be a reality. As times change, Dr. King’s example remains, encouraging a new generation of children to take charge and change the world . . . to be a King. 

Read a review in School Library Journal.

 

Peaceful Fights for Equal Rights

Author: Rob Sanders

Illustrator: Jared Andrew Schorr

Publisher/Date: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers/2018

Ages: 4-8

Themes: protest, equal rights, concept book, multicultural

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

A primer for peaceful protest, resistance, and activism from the author of Rodzilla and Pride: The Story of Harvey Milk and the Rainbow Flag

Protesting. Standing up for what’s right. Uniting around the common good—kids have questions about all of these things they see and hear about each day. Through sparse and lyrical writing, Rob Sanders introduces abstract concepts like “fighting for what you believe in” and turns them into something actionable. Jared Schorr’s bold, bright illustrations brings the resistance to life making it clear that one person can make a difference. And together, we can accomplish anything.

Read my review.

I paired these books because they both prompt children to take action to promote social justice. While Be a King encourages children to follow the lead of the late Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Peaceful Fights for Equal Rights emphasizes actions through an A to Z of social activism. Read together, these picture books will have children ready to boycott, be a friend, march, protest and create a better, more inclusive world, including in their own classrooms.

PPBF – Peaceful Fights for Equal Rights

As I was preparing this post, I couldn’t help but think of the ticker-tape parade occurring just a few miles or so (as the seagulls fly) from my home. The feting of the world champion US women’s soccer team included not just a celebration but a call for equal pay for female soccer players and the recognition by these athletes that they could use their success to advocate for social good. While I have no evidence that these women read today’s Perfect Picture Book, I have every reason to believe that they would support its message.

Title: Peaceful Fights for Equal Rights

Written By: Rob Sanders

Illustrated By: Jared Andrew Schorr

Publisher/Date: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers/2018

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes/Topics: protest, equal rights, concept book, multicultural

Opening:

Assemble. Take action. Create allies.

Brief Synopsis:

A concept book that explores the various ways to fight peacefully for equal rights.

Links to Resources:

  • Make a banner or sign to show an idea that you support or that you want to protest;
  • Think of three things that you and your family or classroom can do to help the environment, support a favorite cause, or welcome a refugee;
  • Download the Educator’s Guide to discover more ideas.

Why I Like this Book:

From A to Z, Sanders provides concrete examples of ways to advocate peacefully for equal rights. With short but lyrical text, Sanders prompts young readers to ask questions, become informed, and take action for what they believe. I love the many verbs used that encourage action. I also love that so many options are offered, including giving time, having hope (and being hope), praying, and voting, among many, many others. Finally, I love that the vocabulary stretches young listeners, especially as there’s a comprehensive Glossary with pronunciation guide, so that children can learn the language of protest. A note about the history of Peaceful Protests rounds out this wonderful concept book that will have families and classrooms excited to take positive action.

Schorr’s cut-paper illustrations are vibrant and add so much context to the sparse text. I found the two-page spreads with one word or phrase particularly powerful, especially “unite” with its many hands of varying hues raised in peace signs.

A Note about Craft:

A book about taking action should leave its readers and listeners ready to take action, but how does an author do that? I think with his sparse text, in short, choppy sentences, all starting with verbs, Sanders encourages people to get up and do something. The low word count also has the effect of leaving space for the illustrator, which Schorr utilizes to include a wide range of diverse characters and cultural and historical references that adults will appreciate and enjoy sharing with youngsters.

This Perfect Picture Book entry will be added to Susanna Hill’s Perfect Picture Book list. Check out the other great picture books featured there!

Perfect Pairing is Hands On

There are so many ways to think about what we do and how we do things. Today’s perfectly paired Picture Books look at one important tool that we all share: our hands!

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Whose Hands Are These? A Community Helper Guessing Book

Author: Miranda Paul

Illustrator: Luciana Navarra Powell

Publisher/Date: Lerner Publishing Group/2016

Ages: 4-9

Themes: hands; rhyming; concept book; helping occupations; non-fiction

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

If your hands can mix and mash, what job might you have? What if your hands reach, wrench, yank, and crank? The hands in this book–and the people attached to them–do all sorts of helpful work. And together, these helpers make their community a safe and fun place to live. As you read, keep an eye out for community members who make repeat appearances! Can you guess all the jobs based on the actions of these busy hands?

Read a review at The Grog.

 

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With My Hands: Poems About Making Things

Author: Amy Ludwig VanDerwater

Illustrators: Lou Fancher & Steve Johnson 

Publisher/Date: Clarion Books/2018

Ages: 4-7

Themes: hands; poetry; art; creativity

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

For young makers and artists, brief, lively poems illustrated by a NYT bestselling duo celebrate the pleasures of working with your hands.
Building, baking, folding, drawing, shaping . . . making something with your own hands is a special, personal experience. Taking an idea from your imagination and turning it into something real is satisfying and makes the maker proud.
With My Hands is an inspiring invitation to tap into creativity and enjoy the hands-on energy that comes from making things.

Read a review at Enjoy and Embrace Learning.

I paired these books because…Who knows the answer? Hands up! Yep, the hands have it! Looking at their hands, Paul explores community helpers in a question-and-answer format that will engage young readers. VanDerwater encourages creativity in With My Hands, a collection of 26 poems that celebrate the joy of being a maker and making such things as a birdhouse or boat. How will you use your hands to help others and be a creator?