Tag Archives: Seasons

PPBF – A Map into the World

I saw today’s Perfect Picture Book on one of the many “best of” lists that have begun popping up these past few weeks. When I read the reviewer’s description and the synopsis, I just had to read, and review, it!

Title: A Map into the World

Written By: Kao Kalia Yang

Illustrated By: Seo Kim

Publisher/Date: Carolrhoda Books, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group/2019

Suitable for Ages: 5-9

Themes/Topics: Hmong, seasons, maps, moving, death, intergenerational, new siblings, immigrant, #OwnVoices

Opening:

The first time we saw the swing and the slide and the garden of the green house with the big windows, my mother sat down in a chair in the backyard and said she did not want to get up. Tais Tais and I looked at the garden, and she pointed out tomatoes, green beans, and a watermelon round as my mother’s belly.

Brief Synopsis: When the narrator, Paj Ntaub, and her family move to a new house, she experiences the seasons and the phases of life, including birth and death.

Links to Resources:

Why I Like this Book:

A Map into the World follows the narrator, Paj Ntaub, as she adjusts to life in a new home and the arrival of twin baby brothers. But even as life is beginning in Paj Ntaub’s house, an elderly neighbor passes away, leaving her husband of over 60 years alone. How does this sensitive young narrator deal with these three big changes? Frankly any one of them on its own would be difficult for any person, let alone a young child, to process.

But young Paj Ntaub is observant. She notes the changes in nature, and she takes comfort in the Hmong story cloth that graces her new home and tells the story of how her family had left its homeland in southeast Asia. Bringing these threads together, she draws a map to show her neighbor how he can navigate the loss of his lifelong partner and find joy in the world once again.

I love the sensitivity exhibited by young Paj Ntaub, and I love how immigrant culture provides a way for the elderly neighbor, a non-immigrant, to process his grief.

A Map into the World is a perfect read for anyone dealing with a life-changing occurrence and for anyone interested in learning more about Hmong culture.

With soft yellows and greens, Kim’s nature-filled illustrations created with “digital graphite, pastels, watercolor, and scanned handmade textures” render a soothing setting for the story and are a gentle reminder that life is filled with seasons of beginnings and endings.

A Note about Craft:

Per an end note, A Map into the World is based upon the author’s actual neighbors, Ruth and Bob, and the author’s own family. She also is an #OwnVoices writer, familiar with Hmong culture and, presumably, problem-solving. I love how she uses aspects of this culture to problem solve and uses the metaphor of a map as a means to adapt to difficult life changes. This is her first picture book.Visit Yang’s website to see more of her books.

Visit Kim’s website to view more of her illustrations.

This Perfect Picture Book entry is being added to Susanna Hill’s Perfect Picture Book list. Check out the other great picture books featured there!

Perfect Pairing – is Feeling Thankful

Whether you’re preparing to celebrate Thanksgiving in the United States, gathering in the harvest, or thinking about the calendar year drawing to a close, late November is a wonderful time to stop, reflect and give gratitude for blessings, big and small.

Thanku: Poems of Gratitude 

Authors: various

Editor: Miranda Paul

Illustrator: Marlena Myles

Publisher/Date: Millbrook Press, an imprint of Lerner Publishing Group/2019

Ages: 6-10

Themes: poetry, gratitude, #WNDB

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

This poetry anthology, edited by Miranda Paul, explores a wide range of ways to be grateful (from gratitude for a puppy to gratitude for family to gratitude for the sky) with poems by a diverse group of contributors, including Joseph Bruchac, Margarita Engle, Cynthia Leitich Smith, Naomi Shihab Nye, Charles Waters, and Jane Yolen.

Read a review at Kirkus Reviews and see an interview with debut illustrator Myles at Kidlit 411.

 

We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga

Author: Traci Sorell

Illustrator: Frané Lessac

Publisher/date: Charlesbridge/2018

Ages: 4-8

Themes: gratitude, seasons, nature, Cherokee, #OwnVoices

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

A look at modern Native American life as told by a citizen of the Cherokee Nation

The word otsaliheliga (oh-jah-LEE-hay-lee-gah) is used by members of the Cherokee Nation to express gratitude. Beginning in the fall with the new year and ending in summer, follow a full Cherokee year of celebrations and experiences.

Appended with a glossary and the complete Cherokee syllabary, originally created by Sequoyah.

Read a review at Miss Marple’s Musings.

I paired these books because both express feelings of gratitude in this season of giving thanks. And if you want to delve more into the subject matter of either of these books, Paul includes a glossary of the various poetry forms used in Thanku, and Sorell includes backmatter about Cherokee culture and its language in We Are Grateful.

Looking for similar reads? See Thank You, Omu!

Perfect Pairing – heads to the Countryside

As the temperatures have been soaring throughout much of the US, I think it’s time to leave the city and head to the countryside!

 

Hey, Hey, Hay! A Tale of Bales and the Machines that Make Them

Author: Christy Mihaly

Illustrator: Joe Cepeda

Publisher/Date: Holiday House Publishing Inc./2018

Ages: 4-8

Themes: hay, farm life, girl power, seasons, rhyming

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

Every bale of hay has a little bit of summer sun stored in the heart of it— learn from a mother-daughter team how hay is made! 

Feeding her horses one cold and wintry day, a girl thinks about all the hard work that went into the fresh-smelling bales she’s using. The rhyming text and brilliant full-page paintings follow the girl and her mother through the summer as they cut, spread, dry and bale in the fields.

Mower blades slice through the grass./A new row falls with every pass./Next we spread the grass to dry./The tedder makes those grasses fly!

This celebration of summer, farming, and family, illustrated by Pura Belpré honor artist Joe Cepeda, includes a glossary of haymaking words, and a recipe for making your own switchel— a traditional farm drink, to cool you down in the summer heat.

Read a review at Picture Books Help Kids Soar.

Mowing

Author: Jessie Haas

Illustrator: Jos. A. Smith

Publisher/Date: Greenwillow Books/1994

Ages: 4-8

Themes: hay, farm life, intergenerational, wildlife

Short Synopsis (from Goodreads):

Nora helps her grandfather mow the field by watching for little animals in the tall grass and warning him to circle the horses and mowing machine around them.

Read a review at Susanna Leonard Hill’s blog.

I paired these books because both provide insight into farm life and an essential activity on many farms, and they both feature female main characters. Told from the first-person point-of-view, the recently-published Hey, Hey, Hay! provides information on the process of baling hay and the seasons on a farm, all in lyrical, rhyming text. The older Mowing focuses on one day when young Nora and her grandfather cut the hay, while making sure they don’t harm any of the local wildlife. Read together, I think they provide insight into life on a farm, something many of us have not experienced.

PPBF: When Green Becomes Tomatoes

I constantly am reminded of how my life has become less and less connected to the seasons in so many ways. As I sit in my air-conditioned home and drive from place to place in the air-conditioned car, eating what had once been considered “seasonal” foods at almost any time of year, I cannot but miss the seasonality of my youth.

The picture book I’ve chosen for today provides a perfect antidote and made me feel like a kid, immersed in nature once again.

 

9781596438521Title: When Green Becomes Tomatoes

Written By: Julie Fogliano

Illustrated By: Julie Morstad

Publisher/date: Roaring Brook Press (Macmillan), 2016

Suitable for Ages: 5-10, but I’d say all ages

Themes/Topics: seasons, poetry, nature

Opening:

Spring

march 20

from a snow-covered tree

one bird singing

each tweet poking

a tiny hole

through the edge of winter

and landing carefully

balancing gently

on the tip of spring

Brief Synopsis: A collection of nature poems divided by seasons

Links to Resources:

  • Think of words or images that make you think of a particular season;
  • Write a free-verse poem using the words or images that come to mind;
  • Think of a color, animal, sound, etc. and then pair it to a season;
  • Older children, or the entire family as a group, can keep a nature diary;
  • Take a nature walk;
  • Plant a garden.

Why I Like this Book: This is a beautiful celebration of the seasons. Divided by date, as diary entries, Julie Fogliano’s lyrical poems take the reader and listener from one spring equinox to the next, beginning, and ending, with the image of one small bluebird poking from winter to spring.

The poems vary in length, but all evoke the sights, sounds, smells, touch and even tastes of the four seasons that children will readily recognize (at least those who live in a region with these four distinct seasons). They can be read separately or together, or grouped by season. Any way they are read, the imagery will leap off the pages: “sounds like slippers” (a house in winter), “snowy arms sagging” (an evergreen in winter), “a star…more flicker glow than blinding”, “a day that drips hot and thick like honey”, and many, many more.

Julie Morstad’s lovely illustrations complement the poems so well, and she includes many multicultural children – an added bonus.

9781596438521.IN02

This is a book to own and savor throughout the year. And for those who can’t wait to read the book to find out, when does green become tomatoes? You’ll know because “there will be sky/ and sun/ and possibly a cloud or two….”

This Perfect Picture Book entry is being added to Susanna Hill’s Perfect Picture Books list. Check out the other great picture books featured there!

PPBF: When Spring Comes

imageAnyone living in the Midwest or the Northeastern United States should understand the reason I chose this perfect picture book for today. If there’s any doubt, a very recent picture of some very sad pansies (before a snow blanket covered them) will show you why!

51So8yP1rNL._SX411_BO1,204,203,200_Title: When Spring Comes

Written By: Kevin Henkes

Illustrated By: Laura Dronzek

Publisher/date: Greenwillow Books, February 9, 2016

Suitable for Ages: 4-8

Themes/Topics: Seasons, spring, weather, nature, waiting

Opening: “Before Spring comes, the trees look like black sticks against the sky. But if you wait, Spring will bring leaves and blossoms.”

Brief Synopsis: In lyrical language accompanied by vibrant illustrations, this book describes the change from winter to spring.

Links to Resources: As the seasons change,

  • draw what you see outside a window. What color is the grass? Are there leaves on the tree? Do you see flowers? What colors are they?
  • Take a walk and look for signs of spring.
  • Prepare for spring by planting seeds indoors (or outdoors if the snow has melted and the ground isn’t frozen). Tomatoes, cucumbers and marigolds are happy to start indoors and get transplanted outdoors. Sunflowers, beets and onions like to start and finish in one place.
  • There are so many springtime crafts! Try a thumbprint hyacinth or a birds’ nest collage

Why I Like this Book: This quiet concept book captures not only the sights, sounds, smells and feel of Spring, but the sense of anticipation for the earth’s rebirth. With a refrain of “If you wait” repeated throughout the book, the reader and listener are drawn into the change of seasons. The bright and simple illustrations complement the lyrical text and focus on aspects of spring that will delight children. The publisher recommends When Spring Comes for ages 4-8; I think younger children will enjoy it, too.

This Perfect Picture Book entry is being added to Susanna Hill’s Perfect Picture Books list. Check out the other great picture books featured there!